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You may find the following websites of interest:.

Historical Societies & Museums

Baltimore Museum of Art: The Baltimore Museum of Art is home to an internationally renowned collection of 19th-century, modern, and contemporary art. Founded in 1914 with a single painting, the BMA today has 90,000 works of art. As a major cultural destination for the greater Baltimore region, the BMA organizes and presents a variety of dynamic exhibitions and innovative programs throughout the year, and frequently hosts special events with cultural and educational partners.

Catonsville Historical Society: The Catonsville Historical Society Inc., is a non-profit organization that was organized in 1973 after the late Mrs. Robert Townsend had bequeathed her home and, her collection of 18th and early 19th century antiques to the Society. Her decorator workshop, which was next to the house, was later remodeled and enlarged for an office, meeting room, and museum to house Catonsville memorabilia. The enlarged and remodeled area ultimately became the Pullen Museum. The Society currently maintains a membership of over 700 people, runs tours of the Townsend House and Pullen Museum, and hosts a variety of activities. Additionally there is a Genealogy Section of the Society that meets once a month.

Howard County Historical Society: The Howard County Historical Society's main goals are the investigation and study of Howard County history; promotion of programs educating members and the community in the history of Howard County and Maryland; to provide library research and museum facilities on the history of Howard County; collecting, preserving and displaying papers, books, manuscripts, records and artifacts of both local and wider interest; encourage research and writing on the part of members and students in public schools and colleges; supporting the marking and preservation of historical sites and buildings; engaging in activities appropriate for a historical society and, finally cooperating with all historical and preservation groups having a common interest.

Lovely Lane Museum: The collection contains approximately 200 slides, 350 mounted photographs and pictures, oil paintings, lithographs, Baltimore Album Quilts and a large collection of Methodist memorabilia. Collection items date from the 18th through the 21st centuries.

Maryland Historical Society: Widely esteemed as one of the nation's finest history museums, houses the largest and most representative collection of authentic Baltimore album quilts. The collection includes more than two dozen prime examples as well as a number of appliquéd chintz and red and green appliquéd quilts, the precursors of the Baltimore album quilt style.

National Society Daughters of the American Revolution: The DAR Museum of American Decorative Arts houses collections from the Society’s 110 years of service. Period rooms and galleries depict scenes of early American life in permanent and rotating exhibitions, preserving American heritage through material culture. Educational programs for all ages, and personalized free, docent-led tours are available. The DAR Museum is home to an outstanding collection of early American quilts. For many years area quilt enthusiasts have volunteered to help the museum maintain and study these important textiles.

Winterthur Museum: Winterthur, an American country estate, is the former home of Henry Francis du Pont (1880-1969), an avid antiques collector and horticulturist. In the early 20th century, H. F. du Pont and his father, Henry Algernon du Pont, designed Winterthur in the spirit of 18th- and19th-century European country houses. Textiles were one of Henry Francis du Pont's first loves. From quilts to gowns, needlework pictures to bedcovers, Winterthur has some of the finest works of textile art made or used in America. The gallery opens with "Fashions and Furnishings," featuring 18th-century gowns, bed hangings, and slip covers; all were expensive textiles that identified a person's taste, cultural background, and wealth. Displays of quilted, woven, and printed textiles culminate in "Needlework: Plain and Fancy," which highlights embroidery, lacework, and samplers. Because of the light-sensitive nature of these objects, textile displays change regularly, making repeat visits a must.


Professional Advisors to the Baltimore Appliqué Society

Karen Kay Buckley

Hazel Carter: Interview

Anne Connery: Interview

Pat Cox

Mimi Dietrich

Linda Eaton

Jennifer Goldsborough

Jeana Kimball

Faye Labanaris

Susan McKelvey

Anita Shackelford

Elly Sienkiewicz

Jan Whitlock


Other Links

American Quilt Study Group

Phyllis Hatcher & Judi Gunter

Marylou McDonald